jungkatz:

Artist Interview: Melinda R. Smith – Expressionist Painter
Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?Trust yourself, and understand that oftentimes the advice people give you about your work has more to do with them than with you. It is the rare individual who doesn’t project him/herself onto you. Develop eyes to see this—it will save you lots of grief.
Continue reading on JungKatz.com…

jungkatz:

Artist Interview: Melinda R. Smith – Expressionist Painter

Any words of wisdom to aspiring artists who want to pursue a similar career?
Trust yourself, and understand that oftentimes the advice people give you about your work has more to do with them than with you. It is the rare individual who doesn’t project him/herself onto you. Develop eyes to see this—it will save you lots of grief.

Continue reading on JungKatz.com…

Reblogged from jungkatz

Dear Artist,

Raise your prices. I know that most solos are nervous about quoting a price and asking for money. We do not negotiate prices in this country like they do at the markets in many nations. We are not prepared to talk about money. So, start high. You can always give a discount if necessary. When someone questions your price, talk about value. Do not immediately assume that a question is a criticism and begin giving discounts or price reductions before you are even asked. Always be prepared to talk about your unique value proposition. Always be prepared to speak about what the customer gets when they buy from you. This takes practice and determination. My advice: practice in the bathroom talking to the person in the mirror…your worst critic. When you can easily quote your price to that face, you can talk to anyone!

Sincerely,

Jackie B. Peterson
www.BetterSmarterRicher.com

"When someone becomes a celebrity, it dehumanizes them in my eyes, which makes it OK for me to feel nothing when I steal from them."
 
When you see an attractive person on a bus or at a coffee shop, maybe you have the restraint or basic human decency to think, “Boy, that person is good-looking, but oh well I’ll just move on with my life.” But if that person was Jennifer Lawrence, a FAMOUS PERSON who knows OTHER FAMOUS PEOPLE, you suddenly feel entitled to see her naked.
 
It’s based on this idea of a contract that all celebrities have allegedly signed. “When she took out her personal camera, snapped a photo of her breasts, and sent them to her boyfriend who happened to be several thousand miles away, she KNEW there would be a risk that I would eventually be able to see them on my iPad, while sitting on the toilet. We entered into this agreement together the minute she decided to be famous and I decided not to be.”
 
Of course, this contract doesn’t exist, and no one would sign it if it did, but that doesn’t stop us from pretending that the unlicensed publication of personal photos is “part of the job” for famous people.
 
I don’t want us to talk about selfies and how we should all apologize to these multimillionaires; I want to talk about privacy and rights while the topic is still timely and exciting enough that people will listen. There are a lot of conversations we SHOULD be having, conversations about celebrity culture, conversations about privacy, conversations about how the Internet is becoming an increasingly dangerous place for women and plenty of others, I’m sure. But the Internet, the giant spider web of loud assholes that it is, is blocking those conversations from view with a bunch of white noise about public shaming and other nonsense. We just need to make sure the right conversations have time and space to take place before a week goes by, some other scandal happens, and we all move on to the next thing.

What We REALLY Mean When We Talk About Leaked Pics | Cracked.com (via wilwheaton)

This post is EXACTLY what we should be talking about!